Learn With Us, Week of August 19

Cool/Cold Season Vegetables
Saturday, August 25, 10:00am – 11:00pm
Durham Garden Center
4536 Hillsborough Rd, Durham, NC 27705
Description:A remarkable variety of tasty vegetables (including root crops and greens) can be happy and healthy when the temperature drops and your tomatoes and squash are all but memories. It’s also the time to plant crops that will rejuvenate your soil over Winter as well as those that can be harvested early next summer. We will also be offering tips on what to do with your garden when it is too cold to get out there.

Call to Register: 919.384.7526

Learn With Us, Week of July 29

Planning Now for a Fall Harvest
Saturday, August 4, 10:00am – 12:00pm
For Garden’s Sake
9197 NC-751, Durham, NC 27713
Description:The approach of cooler temperatures bodes well for vegetable gardeners. Now that the tomatoes and squash are mere memories, we’ll replace them with the things that will make Thanksgiving special.
Also discussed will be overwintering vegetables and cover crops for your beds.

All events are free unless a fee is indicated. All events are hosted at Garden Center. Please register in advance as spots are limited. Email ann@fgsnursery.com or call Ann at 919-484-8759, ext. 100.

Learn With Us, week of August 28

Planning Now for a Fall Harvest
Saturday, Sep 3, 2016 10:00am – 11:30am
Durham Garden Center, 4536 Hillsborough Road, Durham, NC

Now is the right time to plan your cool weather garden. A remarkable variety of tasty vegetables (including root crops and greens) can be happy and healthy when the temperature drops when your tomatoes and squash are all but memories. We will also be offering tips on what to do with your garden when it is too cold to garden.
Presented by Doug Roach, Durham County Extension Master Gardener volunteer
Free/ Registration is required
Contact: 919-384-7526 or ann3dgc@gmail.com
Sign up at the store, e-mail or by phone
Include the seminar title and full name(s) of persons attending

 

Plant Infomation Booth /Master Gardeners
Saturday, Sep 3, 2016 10:00am – 1:00pm
Sarah P. Duke Gardens, 420 Anderson Street, Durham, NC

Plant Information Booth
Durham County Extension Master Gardeners
Having trouble with a plant, pest or pathogen? The Master Gardener volunteers will be in Duke Gardens to answer your questions about plants, gardening, insect pest or disease.
Where: Sarah P. Duke Gardens, 420 Anderson Street, Durham, NC
The Charlotte Brody Discovery Garden

Crop Rotation

by Ann Barnes

It’s a beautiful early August day in Durham. To beat the heat, I am making a list of fall crops I want to grow and deciding where in the garden each will be planted. Earlier this year, I drew and scanned a map of the garden, which I now use to record what is planted each season and to plan for future crop rotation.

 

Portion of garden map, with permanent planting of strawberries labeled.
Portion of garden map, with permanent planting of strawberries labeled.

Although planning your garden ahead and rotating your crops may seem like one of those extra steps you’d like to skip, there are some good reasons why you shouldn’t.

  1. Crop rotation helps keep populations of insect pests and disease causing microorganisms (pathogens) under control. Pathogens and destructive insects tend to prefer certain plant families. Many insects and disease organisms overwinter in the ground or on dead plant material. If the same plant – or a plant from the same family – is planted in one spot year after year, populations of pests will increase over time. Problems that might have been a nuisance can become severe enough to destroy a whole crop. Rotating crops makes it more difficult for pests to build up large populations.
  2. Different types of crops have different nutritional requirements. Some plants, like tomatoes, are heavy feeders – they take more nutrients from the soil. Root vegetables such as carrots are light feeders. Planting crops with the same nutritional requirements in the same spot for too long can decrease soil quality.

For crop rotation to be effective, don’t plant crops from one plant family in the same part of your garden more often than once every three years. This is where drawing and labeling a map of your garden each season comes in handy. Below are some commonly grown crops and their plant families (from http://watauga.ces.ncsu.edu/files/library/95/crop%20rotation%20factsheet.pdf).

Sunflower family lettuces, sunflowers
Goosefoot family beets, spinach, chard, quinoa
Mustard family mustard greens, rutabaga, kale, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, turnip, radish, watercress
Onion family garlic, shallots, leeks, onions, chives
Gourd family melons, squashes, gourds
Pea family peas, beans, jicama, peanuts
Nightshade family peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, potato
Carrot family celery, dill, chervil, fennel, carrot, parsnip, parsley
Grass family corn

Note that not all these plants should be planted now. See the following for planting times:
http://content.ces.ncsu.edu/central-north-carolina-planting-calendar-for-annual-vegetables-fruits-and-herbs.pdf

A sample crop rotation is included in this article: http://extension.psu.edu/pests/ipm/pestproblemsolver/house/home-garden/soil-plant-health/crop-rotation

The Getting Dirty Radio Show http://gettingdirtyradioshow.org/2015/07/31/a-second-season-sowing/ has an excellent post and recording about planting in August, including how to calculate a planting date based on information on seed packages.

Want to read more?
http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu/2012/05/vegetable-crop-rotation/

http://watauga.ces.ncsu.edu/files/library/95/crop%20rotation%20factsheet.pdf

http://blogs.extension.org/mastergardener/2014/07/15/escape-the-heat-by-thinking-fall-gardening/

 

Fall Vegetable Gardening

August is the time to plan and plant for fall. The chart below, from an NCSU Extension publication (www.ces.ncsu.edu/hil/hil-8001.html) provides suggested planting dates for cool season vegetables in the piedmont area of NC.

Vegetables  Suggested Planting Suggested Cultivars Inches Between Plants Planting Depth (inches) Cold
Tolerance
Days to
Maturity
Asparagus (crowns) Nov. 15 to Mar. 15 Mary Washington, Jersey Giant, Jersey Gem 15 6.0 2 years
Beets July 15 to Aug. 15 Ruby Queen, Early Wonder, Red Ace, Pacemaker II 2 0.5 to 1.0 Semi-hardy 55 to 60
 Broccoli July 15 to Aug. 15 DeCicco, Packman, Premium Crop, Green Duke, Emperor 18 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 70 to 80
Brussels sprouts July 1 to 15 Long Island Improved, Jade Cross Hybrid 20 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 90 to 100
Cabbage (plants) Aug 1 to 15 Round Dutch, Early Jersey Wakefield, Red Express, Red Rookie, Sweetbase 12 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 70 to 80
Cabbage, Chinese Aug. 1 to 15 Pak Choi, Mei Ching, Jade Pagoda, China Pride 12 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 75-85
Carrots July 1 to 15 Danvers Half Long, Spartan Bonus, Little Finger, Thumbelina, Scarlet Nantes 2 0.25 to 0.5 Hardy 85 to 95
Cauliflower Aug 1 to 15 Early Snowball “A”, Violet Queen, Snowcrown 18 0.5 to 1.0 Semi-hardy 55 to 65
Collards July 15 to Aug. 15 Vates, Morris’ Improved Heading, Carolina, Blue Max 18 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 60 to 100
Cucumbers, pickling Aug. 1 to 15 Carolina, Calypso, Liberty (mtns.), County Fair ’83 10 1.0 to 1.5 Tender 40 to 50
Cucumbers, slicing Aug. 1 to 15 Poinsett 76, Sweet Slice, County Fair ’83, Salad Bush, Fanfare 10 1.0 to 1.5 Tender 40 to 50
Kale Aug. 15 to Sept. 1 Green Curled Scotch, Early Siberian, Vates, Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch, Blue Knight 6 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 40 to 50
Kohlrabi Aug. 1 to Sept. 1 White Vienna, Grand Duke Hybrid 4 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 50 to 60
Lettuce (leaf) Aug. 1 to Sept. 1 Grand Rapids, Salad Bowl, Buttercrunch, Red Sails, Romulus 6 0.25 to 0.5 Semi-hardy 40 to 50
Lettuce (head) Aug. 15 to 31 Great Lakes, Ithaca 10 0.25 to 0.5 Semi-hardy 70 to 85
Mustard Aug. 1 to Sept. 15 Southern Giant Curled, Tendergreen, Savannah 2 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 30 to 40
Onions (seeds) Sept. 1 to 30 Texas 1015, Granex 33, Candy 4 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 130 to 150
Onions (sets or plants) Sept. 1 to 15 Ebenezer, Excell, Early Grano 4 Hardy 60 to 80
Radishes Aug. 15 to Sept. 15 Early Scarlet Globe, Cherry Belle, Snowbells, White Icicle 1 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 25 to 30
Radish, Diakon Aug. 15 to Sept. 15 April Cross, H. N. Cross 4 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 60 to 75
Rutabagas July 1 to Aug. 1 American Purple Top, Laurentian 4 0.5 to 1.0 Semi-hardy 70 to 80
 Spinach Aug. 1 to 15 Hybrid 7, Dark Green Bloomsdale, Tyee Hybrid 6 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 50 to 60
Turnips Aug. 1 to 31 Purple Top White Globe, Just Right, Tokyo Cross Hybrid, White Egg, All Top 2 0.5 to 1.0 Hardy 55 to 60

See this blog post from 2012 for more information, including a video on preparing for fall planting, as well as the following links: AG-756, Growing Small Farms. A cool season veggie talk is scheduled on 9/14 at the South Library from 3-4 pm.  It is free but registration is desired. More information on this talk will be provided in another blog post, or contact the South Regional Library at 919-560-7410