A Tale of Three Sedges

by Flora O’Brien, EMGV

What’s so great about sedges? They just look like clumps of grass, right? Well, here are three sedges both unusual and interesting for sun, shade and in-between.

Top to bottom: Carex scaposa, Carex Sparkler, Carex Whitetop. Credit Flora O’Brien.

The Cherry Blossom Sedge, (Carex scaposa), has surprising, vibrant, showy pink flowers, something you don’t expect to find in a sedge. The plant grows in clumps, stands about a foot high and has wide arching leaves. It blooms in summer and repeats in the fall. Plant this beauty in part shade to shade in average soil.


Next is Carex phyllocephala, “Sparkler.’ This plant was given to me last winter by a friend. What I love is that it looks like a small palm tree. The foliage is variegated and sits atop one- to two-foot tall cane-like stems. This is also a clump former and does best in part shade to deep shade.




And for the sun, try Rhynchospora colorate or Star Sedge (also known as Whitetop Sedge). The flowers themselves are tiny but have long flowing bracts, white near the flower, then changing to green near the tip. From a distance they look like bobbing white daisies. This plant spreads by rhizomes so it will need to be thinned occasionally. I have included a close-up photo to illustrate the lovely form.



So, don’t pass over sedges believing them to be boring. Check these three out and prepare to be amazed.

Resources & Further Reading https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/rhynchospora-colorata/
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=256661
https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=rhco7


Garden Hose Maintenance and Repair

By Ann Barnes, EMGV

A garden hose may not be the most exciting tool you have in your shed, garage, or yard, but it is certainly one of the most essential. Between watering your lawn and garden, washing a vehicle, and keeping your steps or favorite outdoor chair clean, you may find yourself using the garden hose many times per week.

A good hose can last for many years with just a little maintenance. To keep it in its best condition, either coil your hose or hang it after each use. Leaving a hose kinked rather than coiled can cause a weak spot that could later crack and leak. Hoses should also be protected from temperature extremes to prolong the life of the hose materials. If you have an easily accessible spot to hang your hose in a garage, crawl space, or shed, this would be an ideal place to store it when not in use. If keeping it outdoors is the best option for you, try to find a shady spot to coil your hose, especially during the heat of the summer. UV light can degrade the hose, leading to cracks. Once the weather turns cold, lift your hose to drain any water out and move it to a protected location. Don’t allow water to freeze in your hose, as ice will expand and may cause the hose to burst.

Even with proper storage and care, your hose may develop a leak over time. If water is leaking from the connection between the hose and spigot, the repair may be a simple one. There should be a rubber or plastic washer in the coupling that attaches to the spigot (the “female end” of the hose). Simply remove the existing washer and replace it with a new one. Some hose manufacturers recommend replacing the washer every year or so. If you have leaks where a sprayer nozzle connects to your hose, replacing the washer on your sprayer could be the solution there as well. The part is inexpensive and easy to install, so why not buy a bag of washers and replace them when you get your hose out of winter storage each year?

If your hose has developed a crack or hole, you may be able to repair rather than replace it. Small holes or cracks can be repaired with electrical tape or a specialty hose repair tape. Duct tape is not recommended for more than a temporary fix, since it is not designed to be water tight.

A large crack, multiple leaks, or a run-in with a string trimmer may require splicing. This is not a difficult task and is much less expensive than replacing a good hose. You will need a hose mending kit, available from any hardware store. The kit consists of a brass (or plastic) fitting and two clamps. Many kits are designed to fit both 5/8” and 3/4” diameter hoses, but always make sure you are purchasing one that fits the hose you own. To repair the hose, disconnect and drain the hose and cut out the damaged section. Loosen the clamps from the fitting and slide a clamp on each side of the area to be spliced. Next, insert the fitting into the hose. The fitting is designed to fit tightly, so you may need to soak the cut ends of the hose in hot water to soften them first — or repair your hose in the sun on a warm day. Once the fitting is tightly inserted into both sides of the splice, push the clamps as close to the middle of the splice as possible and tighten the clamps with a screwdriver. Now you can reconnect your hose and make sure there are no more leaks.

If the couplings at either end of the hose are bent or otherwise damaged, they can be replaced using a similar technique. In addition to making sure you purchase a correct-diameter kit, check that the kit is for the end you need to replace. The coupling that goes to the spigot is often called the female end, while the side that attaches to a sprayer is the male end. Remove the damaged coupling, slide the clamp onto the hose at the cut end, insert the fitting, then tighten the clamp.

Proper storage and care will help to prevent hose leaks, but even the best garden hose may eventually become damaged. Hopefully, these tips will give you the confidence to repair rather than replace a leaky hose.

Resources & Further Reading

https://ask.extension.org/questions/430281

https://gilmour.com/house-hose-maintaining-repairing-longer-life

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/repairing-a-garden-hose/

October: To Do in the Garden

by Gary Crispell, EMGV

Of course, it’s October! It happens every year, although I would not have been surprised if it did not happen this year (or if November preceded it). It has been an exceptionally weird year. September was … well, exactly. September was. We did get some non-tropical rain as well as some of the tropical stuff. There were hurricanes, remnants of hurricanes and hundreds-of-miles-off-shore-and-still-buried-NC-12-with-sand-and-salt-water hurricanes. There are horrendous wildfires in the west and the ever-present life altering Covid-19. I am not even going to start on the toxic political climate.

On a lighter note, the accidental cottage garden looks better than it did at the beginning of September (see photos below). (Ain’t rain wonderful?) The plantings along the driveway don’t get as much sun since the equinox, so they don’t have much to offer right now. There are a couple of asters (Symphyotrichum puniceum and Aster novea-angliae), a lone cock’s comb (Celosia plumosa) and some hardy ageratum (Eupatorium coelestinum). Along the gable end, the galardia (Galardia puchella) and lance leaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata) are still putting on a show. In the more intentional (less accidental?) part of the garden the spreading mum (Chrysantemum x unknown), a wand flower (Guara lindheimeri) and a stonecrop (Hylotelephium “Herbstsfreude” ‘Autumn Joy’) lighten up the front of the rampant tomato plants. BTW, the stonecrop is a cross-genus hybrid cross between Sedum telephium and a species of ice plant, Hylotelephium spectabile.  (The preceding trivia is presented for the benefit of your erudition at no extra charge.)

Photos – Clockwise from upper right: Sedum autumn joy, chrysanthemum and guara, hardy ageratum, galatia and coreopsis. Credit G. Crispell.


“Yo, Dude! Quit your yammering and tell the people what to do in the garden this month.” Oh, yeah.  Right. Here ya go, y’all. Enjoy October.

Fertilizing 
– Not much to do here unless you are planting spring flowering bulbs. Should that be the case, incorporate a little balanced fertilizer (10-10-10 or equivalent) into the soil as you plant.
– Store any leftover fertilizer in a dry place for the winter.

Planting
– Plant the above-mentioned spring flowering bulbs (E.g. hyacinths, tulips, daffodils, crocuses, etc.).
– Pansies! Those plucky members of the Viola genus who can brighten up a gray winter day should be on everyone’s list unless, of course, there are deer nearby. Apparently, the pansies make a great dessert after a meal of azalea branches. Plant them soon as the more established they are when it gets cold the better able they will be to withstand the cold.
– “Fall is for planting.”  It’s not just a slogan from the nursery industry. It is gospel. The very best time to plant any new landscape plants you have been planning for is now.
– Peonies can be planted or transplanted now.
– In the vegetable garden consider a nitrogen fixing cover crop like red clover, hairy vetch or winter rye.  This will help keep down the weeds and add nitrogen to the soil. In the spring just till it into the soil to add nutrients and organic matter.
– If you happen to be one of the foresighted people who have a cold frame* now is the appropriate time to plant a winter’s worth of salad. Lettuce, green onions, radishes, carrots, spinach and other leafy greens will grace your salad bowl all winter if planted now.

Pruning
– Once frost (It’s October; It is going to frost!) has finished the decimation of the perennial garden cut off all the dead tops and throw them on the compost pile.
– Root prune* any trees or plants you plan on moving in the spring.

Spraying
Unless you have a lace bug problem it is time to clean up and winterize the sprayer and store the pesticides in a secured dry location that will not freeze. As to the lace bugs they are active whenever the leaf surface temperature is warm enough (i.e. whenever the sun shines on the leaves).  A horticultural oil spray can be helpful in controlling both feeding adults and egg stages.

Lawn Care*
– Maintain adequate moisture levels for any newly seeded or sodded lawns. 
– Avoid leaf buildup on lawns.
– Tall fescue and bluegrass (not the fiddlin’ kind) can still be planted in October.

Propagation
– Keep an eye on any new cuttings in the cold frame (the one without the salad greens in it). They should be checked at least twice a month and watered as needed.
– If you are a gardener lucky enough to be able to grow rhubarb now is the time to dig and divide it.

Other stuff to do that will keep you outdoors while the leaves turn color

Take soil samples while they are still FREE. NCDOA will charge for them from November to April. Supplies are available for curbside pickup at the back of the Extension office, 721 Foster Street.

Put those raked or blown leaves into the compost bin or till them into the veggie garden.

Clean, fill and put out the bird feeders.

Dig and store (cool, dark, dry) tender summer flowering bulbs (E.g. gladioli, dahlia, caladium) before frost.

Clean up, lubricate and otherwise prepare lawn and garden equipment for its long winter’s rest.

A mea culpa. This writer neglected to inform you that it is time to band trees that are susceptible to canker worm invasions. This involves wrapping and securing the trunk with a coarse material like burlap or quilt batting about four or five feet above the ground. That in turn is wrapped with a corrugated paper wrap that is then covered with the stickiest gooeyest stuff you’ve ever played with. All these materials are available at some nursery/garden centers one of which is very proximal to the Durham Extension office.

For a fun activity now that will yield fresh living flowers in the bleak mid-winter try your hand at forcing spring flowering bulbs. Plant bulbs in pots early in October and place them in the refrigerator. In 12 weeks bring them out into the house and watch them grow and bloom. Kids love it.

Further Reading

Root pruning will encourage the plant to produce a flush of new feeder roots. The goal is to allow the plant to develop new feeder roots within the zone of the future root ball that will be moved. Learn more: https://extension.psu.edu/transplanting-or-moving-trees-and-shrubs-in-the-landscape

Fall Lawn Care: Evaluate before you Renovate https://www.trianglegardener.com/fall-lawn-care-tip-evaluate-before-you-renovate/

How to Build and Maintain a Cold Frame https://www.hws.edu/fli/pdf/cold_frame.pdf

Gold is Good but ‘Plantinum’ is Better! Creating a Bird-friendly Habitat: The Sequel

by Wendy Diaz, EMGV

On July 9, 2020, the New Hope Audubon Society (NHAS) revisited my suburban yard to evaluate it after I implemented their recommendations of their initial visit two years ago. I wrote about this very interesting experience in three installments for the Durham Master Gardener Blog[i] in November 2018. I earned the “Gold” level of certification from the NHAS Bird Friendly Habitat back in August, 2018 but I did not receive the highest level of Platinum, largely because greater than 10% of my available property, which is about 13,250 sq. ft. of a total of 16,117 sq. ft., was still covered by high-threat invasive species despite already having removed some exotics. These areas were located mostly along the north side yard and east-facing back yard of my property and native plants only covered 30% of the remainder of my yard. I had to increase the native plant coverage from 30% to 50% and remove the invasive species to less than 10% in order to achieve the platinum level. This was a fair amount of work but surprisingly easy when I did it in stages over two years. This time, two representatives (Alan Johnson and Jeanne Arnts) came from the New Hope Audubon Society and walked around my yard and natural buffer area and patiently answered all my questions. Jeanne Arnts took notes and both of them pointed out species of plants that were good for the birds.

It is well documented that planting native plant species is beneficial for birds and other wildlife[ii]. Native plants, especially native trees, host a variety of insects that are necessary for birds to feed their young and these plants host the insects that are vital to birds and the complex food webs that evolved in our local area. Not only do native gardens provide food, they provide shelter and nesting sites for birds. They also have the added benefit of reducing the need of added resources such as fertilizer because they are uniquely adapted to and thrive in our local area. Even with a portion of my suburban backyard preserved as a natural area with mature hardwoods, much of my yard space had at one time, 10 of the 17 most invasive species listed as species to avoid in the Piedmont North Carolina[iii]

  1. English ivy (Hedera helix), 
  2. Privets (Ligustrum spp.), 
  3. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellate), 
  4. Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis), 
  5. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), 
  6. Mimosa (Albizia julibrissin), 
  7. Periwinkle, Vinca (Vinca spp.), 
  8. Bradford pear (Pyrus calleryana)
  9. Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum)
  10.  Sacred bamboo (Nandina domestica)

In addition, I unwittingly planted the non-native invasive species: Golden rain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata), burning bush (Euonymus alatus) and monkey grass (Ophiopogon japonicas) and other invasive plants just appeared in my yard without my help, like purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma) and Chinese holly (Ilex cornuta).

The 2018 visit was a custom assessment of my yard and garden with respect to native plant species and wildlife habitat and a very educational two hours. I was delighted to be informed that I had several native wildflowers growing in my natural area like the diminutive native Crane-fly orchids (Tipularia discolor; also a subject of another blog article https://durhammastergardeners.com/2020/07/) under my beech tree (Fagus grandifolia) as well as another shade-tolerant native Redring Milkweed (Asclepias variegata L.) near a very large white oak.  In the natural buffer area there was one of North Carolina’s smallest woody plants, Spotted Wintergreen (Chimaphila maculate). A native ground cover of Virginia snakeroot (Aristolochia serpentaria) was also scattered throughout the leaf litter. Other native shrubs of arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum) and St. Andrew’s-cross (Hypericum hypericoides (L.) Crantz) were quite common in my backyard, not to mention a young Black gumtree (Nyssa sylvatica), which sadly succumbed to a dry spell in September, 2019 when I was out of the country.

Redring Milkweed (Asclepias variegata L.) near a very large white oak.
Photo taken June 3, 2020

The Work

A few weeks after the first visit my husband and I started to tackle the invasive species removal. We waited until there was a substantial rain to loosen the soil around the plant roots. We took out the invasive species armed with hand pruners, lopper, shovel, lawnmower and chainsaw. In a matter of a few days stretched over the past two years we completed Stage 1 and 2 of the removal of invasive species. One of the advantages of pulling and rolling the periwinkle (Vinca major) after a rain to loosen the soil or just mowing was that I did not have to use an herbicide which may have harmed the soil and prevented germination of native plants which could germinate now that they were exposed to sunlight. 

Clockwise from left: On November 5 and 12, 2018 Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) was removed with loppers and the trunk was cut with a chain saw. A woodpecker and robin immediately investigated the newly exposed soil. On November 3, 2018, after a good rain, the periwinkle was pulled up by the roots behind the birdbath and near the concrete bench. I found the periwinkle stems matted and could be rolled as I progressively pulled up the roots and made a ball. My husband used a chainsaw to take out the firebush on December 16, 2018. The following year on May 7, 2019 I dug out the coreopsis and monkey grass that was taking over my front perennial bed. The monkey grass roots were so tangled that I was able to remove it in one long caterpillar-like piece. On April 28, 2019, I mowed the large patch of periwinkle and Japanese honeysuckle along the north side yard with the lawn mower. My son mowed it again several months later when new shoots appeared but the second mowing along with a dry September finished it off for good except for an occasional plant that I weeded this year. 

I also planted some pink and white muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) to replace the crabgrass that inevitably takes over the strip of lawn between the driveways. The last job was the removal of the forsythia hedge (bottom right corner) for a spring planting of Fothergilla bushes (purchased just before the Covid-19 lockdown) behind the birdbath in addition to a bed along the south side of the house on March 14, 2020. I did not have a chance to purchase any more native plants this year but Mother Nature helped out with the abundant rainfall this spring and many Eastern red cedars (Juniperus virginians) grew and filled in the area on the north side along with Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). Plants that I purchased like Virginia sweet spire (Itea virginica), dwarf crested iris (Iris cristata) and wild ginger (Asarum canadense) became established and spread. It has been an excellent year for moss and it has spread downslope with little encouragement, from our fairy garden to our cedar bench along our property boundary. I also collected wild columbine seeds and spread them around the newly exposed areas. I did not amend the soil other than spreading leaves and pine needles, which I gathered off my fescue lawn, around my native plants.

White Muhly Grass (Muhlenbergla capillaris ‘White Cloud’ Photo by Wendy Diaz on November 10, 2019
One of two moss gardens I maintain (weed and sweep only) that has slowly spread downslope from the base of red maples to the cedar bench along our north property boundary. The fairy moss garden in the foreground got special mention in the Audubon report. Along with the moss are natives both planted and natural: Wild ginger (planted in April, 2019), fern (planted 2014), Hearts a Bustin’ (Euonymous americanus), St. Andrew’s cross (Hypericum hypericoides), Tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) seedling, arrow wood (Vibrurnum dentatum) and Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia).
The fairy moss garden was a pandemic project on Memorial Day and received special mention in the Audubon report. My neighbor removed invasive bamboo from their backyard and I used the tips to construct the fairy fence and my husband cut tiny pieces for the red cedar door window grill.
Photo taken May 27, 2020

We managed to complete both Stage I and Stage II Removal plans as outlined in my blog article of November, 2018 without complaint but, due to Covid-19 and other extended family duties, I did not plant as many of the alternatives recommended to me by NHAS in their report from the first visit. I wasn’t having much luck sourcing some of the native ground covers I wanted to plant anyway like Frog fruit (Phylla nodiflora). I updated my plant list with the recent purchases of native plants in the fall of 2018 and spring of 2019 and 2020 (muhly grass, wild ginger, dwarf crested iris, fothergilla etc.) along with other natives pointed out to me by the Audubon Society representatives on their second visit: American pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) and American boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum). I transplanted some blueberries from under my beech tree to the south yard. This year several plants of spotted wintergreen (Chimaphila maculate) have now appeared under my beech tree along with four more groups of cranefly orchids (Tipularia discolor). I developed a nursery of Eastern red cedar in an area mostly covered by wild columbine, which tended to have numerous red cedar seedlings anyway. I will transplant them along my southern property boundary as a privacy screen when they get a bit larger. 

Before (left photo taken August 26, 2019) Chinese wisteria removal. Trees along property boundary and in the background: Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), Smooth sumac, Bitternut hickory (Carya cordiformis), Fringe tree, dogwood (Cornus florida) and Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria Japonica). After the wisteria removal (right photo taken September 9, 2020). Move arrow to the left to see newly planted and self-seed native species near hanging garden structure: cross vine (Bignonia capreolata; on left post), Fothergilla (Fothergilla Major ‘Mount Airy’; around the right post), purple flowers of the New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) and Wild columbine (Aquilegia canadensis). Cryptomeria snag (died September 2019) behind New York ironweed. The bird feeder was installed in July, 2020. In the area formerly covered by the Chinese wisteria, climbing dogbane, Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra Linnaeaus) and Hairy skullcap have appeared as well as a family of Eastern fence lizards.
Before (left photo taken October 17, 2018) and after periwinkle removal (right photo taken September 10, 2020). A gourd is temporary ground cover until I find alternative native plants. Not many weeds appeared as the pine needles are thick in this area. Occasionally, Golden rain tree seedlings need to be weeded. A few St. Andrew’s Cross seedlings were transplanted in front of the newly planted fothergilla bushes that replaced the forsythia hedge. Wild columbine, frost aster and St. Andrew’s cross all volunteered to grow instead here in the former perwinkle bed.
Left: Small area of periwinkle near concrete bench and hammock. Daphne odora (near bench) died in 2019. Smooth sumac shrub (self-seeded) and turned bright orange and yellow (behind bench). Photo taken November 3, 2018 Right: Periwinkle was removed by pulling up the roots and rolling it into a ball. Area was thinly mulched beneath my husband’s hammock in 2020 and some native plants appeared: Wild Columbine, Virginia creeper, Smooth sumac and Eastern red cedar. I planted iris bulbs and replaced the Daphne (behind clay pot) with a propagated seedling. A volunteer dogwood and coral honeysuckle (staked to the right) in the less-shaded front of the former periwinkle bed. Photo taken September 10, 2020
Large bed of Periwinkle and Japanese honeysuckle on north side yard. Photo taken April 27, 2019.
North side yard has American beauty berry (planted), muscadine grape, Virginia creeper, wild columbine (seeded), Virginia sweetspire (planted), hairy skullcap, dwarf-crested iris (planted), Virginia snakeroot, fringe tree (Chionanthus virginicus), oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia; propagated) and Eastern red cedar.green-headed coneflower (Rudbeckia lacyiniata) in background adjacent to moss garden. Japanese hop and Chinese elm next to stake on the left side of photograph was removed. Photo taken August 28, 2020.
Former bed of periwinkle is filling in nicely with planted and self-seed native species after only one year. The Virginia sweetspire has a bit of fall color and the beauty berry is loaded with purple berries. Green-headed cone flower in bloom in the background at the end of the moss garden A red maple snag is located on the right side of the Virginia sweetspire. Photo taken September 15, 2020

The Maintenance

They don’t call them invasive species for no reason and some species need constant vigiliance and weeding. It is a task that takes very little effort now that our new Covid-19 habit of walking through our yard reveals new invaders when they first appear and are easily dealt with. A new crop of mimosa seedlings sprouted up in the north side yard after the abundant August rain this year but they were easily dispatched. And it has been five years since we cut down the mimosa tree! In addition, the occasional golden raintree seedling shows up in the bed behind the birdbath. If I find myself missing the bright yellow blossoms of the golden rain tree out my bedroom window I will look at this photograph instead which is just as enjoyable but without the additional work of weeding.

Also, new alien plants appeared in the north side yard like the Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia), Japanese hop (humulopsis scandens) and the dayflower (Commelina communis) which were also pulled up. Photographs from left: Golden rain tree seedling, golden raintree in bloom (now removed) and mimosa seedlings in foreground next to dwarf-crested iris.

I would like to purchase some spice bush (Lindera benzoin) to fill in the areas where the forsythia hedge was removed and also to increase the midlevel landscape with shrubs in my yard and shade out the weeds. I plan on replacing the non-native morning glory at the mailbox next year with the native clematis viorna (Clematis viorna).

The Reward

I was delighted to see many native wildflowers either spread or appear for the first time without me planting them in the areas I cleared of Chinese wisteria, periwinkle and Japanese honeysuckle and observing the garden become more vibrant. I also refrained from applying a thick layer of mulch in other parts of the natural tree area this year. It is amazing what nature can do with a little less competition from invasives and a little more sunlight. And of course, it helped that my neighbors and I organized and advocated to preserve a 30-foot tree buffer between our neighborhood and the proposed new subdivision, which replaced the forest behind my house back in 2003. Photographs clockwise from left: Blue-eyed grass (Sisryrinchium angustifolium), lyreleaf sage (Salvia lyrata), spotted wintergreen (Chimaphila maculate), redring milkweed (Asclepias variegata L.), flowering spurge (Euphorbia corollata), hairy skullcap (Scutellaria elliptica), American boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) and wild columbine (Aquilegla canadensis).

The abundant rainfall this spring produced native plants such as Coral honeysuckle, St. Andrew’s cross, Virginia snakeroot or Dutchman’s pipe and climbing dogbane to appear in the former Chinese wisteria area of the backyard. My tulip poplar tree in the front yard also had an unusual amount of blossoms for the bees to enjoy.

One of the requirements for certification is to have eight or more wildlife habitat options from the Audubon list of 13. I managed to have the entire list: water feature/bird bath, no cats or kept indoors, several functional birdhouses, brown-headed nuthatch birdhouse (species of concern), rock piles and branch bundles, pollinator garden(s), several snags (maple, black gum, cedar and cryptomeria), window stickers to reduce collisions, leaf litter, reduced lawn areas, minimal use of nonorganic fertilizers, no usage of rodenticides and replaced 30-year-old gas lawn mower, hedge-clipper and weed-eater with battery powered tools. Thanks to my industrious neighbor and friend, Roger Fortman, who made and gave me a bird feeder and two more birdhouses, I have more than the minimum required wildlife habitat options and a very good wildlife habitat suburban garden and yard.

Beautyberry hedge (Callicarpa Americana) along the south property boundary with southern exposure. Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) snag in the background provides habitat and forage for insects and supports a new birdhouse. Photo taken September 10, 2020

If You Plant It They Will Come

My yard now has 73 native plant species including canopy and understory trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants and vines which flower at different times throughout most of the year. I also have large areas with leaf litter in my yard and a few trimmed dead trees left standing (snags). As the native plants have spread and established themselves, I have observed more caterpillars, butterflies, bees, fireflies and birds as well as lizards, toads and frogs. Photographs clockwise from left: Eastern tiger swallowtail and monarch butterfly on common milkweed (Asclepia syriaca), bumble bee and common buckeye butterfly on butterfly weed (Asclepia tuberose) and Eastern tiger swallowtail on Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) and scarlet rose mallow (Hibiscus coccinneus).

Photographs from left: Bumble bee on purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) and dragonfly on dead milkweed leaf.

Many birds have been observed in the yard this year. Photographs clockwise from left: Female Red-bellied woodpecker and fledgling, bluebird, juvenile Ruby-throated hummingbird, goldfinch, White-breasted nuthatch, male bluebird with beetle and Red-tailed hawks.

Learning about many new native plants since that first NHAS visit in 2018 has been interesting and I found the follow-up visit rewarding and well worth the effort. I do not have any regrets about removing all invasive ornamental plants from my yard as it has given me the opportunity to learn and discover new native alternatives to plant and a chance to welcome nature’s gifts each spring. My yard is much more interesting and entertaining as well because there is a large variety of plants which flower throughout most of the year and wildlife to watch. This transformation to a yard where I can enjoy nature couldn’t have happened at a better time. All the work was worth it and I achieved the highest level of certification. 

While I have achieved my goal of Platinum certification, my gardening work is never done and the plan is to remove the severely pruned Burford holly (Ilex cornuta ‘Burford’) foundation hedge at the front of the house. Alan Johnson suggested native alternatives such as dwarf yaupon holly (Illex glabra) or sweet pepper bush (Clethra anifolia) to replace the old hedge. He said the ‘Hummingbird’ cultivar produces numerous flowers and good fall color. To compliment these new shrubs other sun-loving herbaceous perennials such as golden alexander (Zizia), mountain mint (Pycnanthemum mutium) and aster (Symphyotrichum spp.) were suggested. There are many other natives to choose from but they reminded me that it is very important to choose native plants that were grown without the use of neonicotinoids and they provided source nursery’s that did not use this systemic insecticide in their four page report which they emailed to me shortly after their visit.

Future project this fall will be to remove the Burford holly and nandina (circled in red) and plant native foundation shrubs and flowers. Beautyberry, New York ironweed and American pokeweed (green arrows) have already ‘moved in’ to this sunny part of my front yard.
Photo taken September 10, 2020

I proudly hang the Audubon sign on my mailbox for passersby to see and hopefully it will encourage at least one neighbor to undertake this certification process and rewarding experience. I want to inspire like-minded gardeners to contact the New Hope Audubon Society for their own certification so they too can sit back and enjoy the birds they will attract. I am looking forward to next spring and to observing how the garden has matured and perhaps I will see the spotted wintergreen finally flower or a brown-headed nuthatch take up residence in its waiting home. In the meantime, I will buy a frame for my Platinum Certificate from the New Hope Audubon Society.

References:

[i] https://durhammastergardeners.com/2018/11/ November 7, 2020; November 10,  2020 and November 21, 2020

[ii] http://www.bringingnaturehome.net

[iii] https://nc.audubon.org/sites/default/files/piedmont_plants_final.pdf

Resources for Bird Friendly Habitat Certification:

Certification Request Form:

Brochure: http://www.newhopeaudubon.org/wpcontent/themes/nhas/library/docs/certificationBrochure.pdf

Native Plant List and Suppliers:

Bird Friendly Habitat Information:

700 Bird-Friendly Native Plants for North Carolina

https://nc.audubon.org/700

Further Reading:

  1. http://ncbg.unc.edu/uploads/files/ControllingBooklet.pdf
  2. https://projects.ncsu.edu/goingnative/howto/mapping/invexse/index.html
  3. http://www.ncwildflower.org/plant_galleries/invasives_list
  4. http://moinvasives.org/wpcontent/uploads/2016/03/MNRC_EmergingInvasives_QuinnLong_2016_0203_NotesPage.pdf

A Garden Surprise

by Cathy Halloran, EMGV

My husband and I were in need of a break from our usual, daily Covid-routine of exercise, gardening and deciding on dinner. In pre-Covid days, we would take the Durham-Washington DC Amtrak to visit friends in D.C. One stop we always found curious was Wilson, NC. It didn’t look like a very vibrant town, yet it was an Amtrak stop. So, in late June, we packed a picnic and headed East/Southeast to Wilson.

We suspect Wilson, in its glory, was a prosperous tobacco town. Its downtown is now quiet and sedate. However, on the edge of town is a jewel called the Wilson Botanical Gardens. It surrounds the site of the Wilson Agricultural Center and was started in 2003 with grants to develop a community garden. The gardens are maintained by the Wilson County Extension Master Gardener Volunteers. The gardens were designed to show the diversity of plant materials that can be used in the home landscape, and to educate and entertain visitors.

The garden delivered its intent. There are sections for every interest, from native plants to perennial borders, to trees, ornamental grasses, pollinator attractors, and a children’s secret garden. 

The area we found most interesting and educational was how they incorporated STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) into the garden. Each STEM sign had a bar code to access more detailed information once one leaves the garden.

The Science section showcased and explained a rain garden and carnivorous plants. 

Solar energy and a weather station were used to demonstrate Technology, plus they added an old-fashion human sundial and explained how it can tell time.

A windmill and hydroponic garden were used to demonstrate Engineering. The windmill, when powered by wind, circulates the water in a holding basin where they grow plants.

The hardest area was Mathematics where the Fibonacci Spiral was explained and the use of only three measurements to calculate the height of a tree.

The last section we enjoyed was the Culinary and Medicinal Herb Garden. Each plant was marked with the usual botanical information, then added its medicinal qualities.

All photos by C. Halloran

If you need an outing where you are surrounded by beautiful plants and trees, and want to learn something and have fun, we highly recommend the Wilson Botanical Gardens. They have benches tucked in shady areas to enjoy a picnic. The garden is open 365 days a year and restrooms are accessible 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. The garden is located at 1806 SW Goldboro Street, Wilson, NC. Masks and social distancing are required.

A map of the garden:
https://www.wilsonbotanicalgarden.org/map