January To-do List

Lawn Care
•    Keep tree leaves from collecting on your lawn.

Fertilizing
•    Spread ashes from the fireplace around gardens and bulb beds where soil pH is below 6.0.  Avoid acid-loving plants.  (3 lbs of ash = 1 lb of limestone)
•    Now is the time to put out limestone if needed (it takes about three months for lime to change the soil’s pH)
•    Fertilize houseplants as needed.

Planting
•    Asparagus crowns can be planted at this time.

Propagation
•    Hardwood cuttings of many landscape plants like forsythia (yellow bells), flowering quince, weigela, crape myrtle, juniper, spirea and hydrangea can be taken this month.

Pruning
•    Prune grape vines
•    Any dead or diseased wood can be pruned out anytime of the year.
•    Weeds or unnecessary trees should be removed from the landscape.

Spraying
•    None

Other Activities
•    Poinsettias should be placed in the sunniest room in the house.
•    If you have received your soil recommendations, apply lime as suggested.  Don’t apply fertilizer until spring.
•    Order fruit trees and grape vines now if you wish to plant them in February and March.
•    Continue putting the leaves from your yard into a compost bin.

What to Do in December

Lawn Care
•    Maintain cool season grasses by mowing as needed.
•    Keep tree leaves from collecting on your lawn.

Fertilizing
•    Spread ashes from the fireplace around gardens and bulb beds where soil pH is below 6.0.  Avoid acid-loving plants.  (3 lbs of ash = 1 lb of limestone)
•    Now is the time to put out limestone if needed (it takes about three months for lime to change the soil’s pH)
•    Fertilize houseplants as needed.

Planting
•    Now is a good time to set out or transplant landscape plants if the ground isn’t frozen.  Be sure to “open up” the root balls on container plants.

Pruning
•    Prune berry-producing plants, if berries are desired in table arrangements over the holidays.
•    Cut back herbaceous perennials after the frost kills the tops.
•    Any dead or diseased wood can be pruned out anytime of the year.
•    Weeds or unnecessary trees should be removed from the landscape.

Spraying
•    None

Other Activities
•    Keep your Christmas tree in water and away from heat sources.
•    Poinsettias should be placed in the sunniest room in the house.
•    If you have received your soil recommendations, apply lime as suggested.  Don’t apply fertilizer until spring.
•    Order fruit trees and grape vines now if you wish to plant them in February and March.
•    Cover strawberries with pine straw or wheat barley to protect them from the cold.
•    Continue putting the leaves from your yard into a compost bin.
•    If you cover your shrubs, be cautious and use only burlap or white plastic.

What to do in November

Lawn Care
•    Maintain cool season grasses by mowing as needed.
•    Keep tree leaves from collecting on your lawn.
•    Control fire ants with either a bait or contact.

Fertilizing
•    Spread ashes from the fireplace around gardens and bulb bed where soil pH is below 6.0.  Avoid acid-loving plants.

Planting
•    Plant one-year-old asparagus crowns in the vegetable garden this month.
•    If you don’t use your garden through the fall and winter months, consider planting a cover crop like annual rye, barley, or wheat.
•    Now is a good time to set out or transplant landscape plants.  Be sure to “open up” the root balls on container plants.

Pruning
•    The foliage from existing asparagus can be cut down the ground after the first killing frost.
•    Cut back herbaceous perennials after the frost kills the tops.
•    Any dead or diseased wood can be pruned out anytime of the year.
•    Weeds or unnecessary trees should be removed from the landscape.
•    Root prune any plants you plan to move next spring.

Spraying
•    None

Other Activities
•    Take soil samples from your vegetable garden if you haven’t already done so.
•    If you have received your soil recommendations, apply lime as suggested.  Don’t apply fertilizer till spring.
•    Order fruit trees and grape vines now if you wish to plant them in February and March.
•    Prepare bird feeders.
•    Don’t forget to water evergreens trees and shrubs thoroughly before winter.
•    Continue putting the leaves from your yard into a compost bin.
•    Poinsettias should be placed in the sunniest room in the house.

What to Do In September

Planting

  • September is a good time to set out landscape plants. Shop early to find the nicest shrubs.
  • When planting containerized plants, try to be certain to disturb or “open up” the plants’ root ball.
  • Set out new chrysanthemum plants this month.
  • Plant pansies to add color to your yard in the autumn, winter and spring months.
  • Groundcovers will become well established if planted now.
  • Transplant any evergreen trees or shrubs that need moving this month.
  • Plant the following fall vegetables in September: mustard, onion, radish and turnip.

Pruning

  • Do NOT prune shrubs in September or October..
  • Remove “weed” or unnecessary trees from your landscape.
  • Root prune any trees or plants you plan to move next spring.

Spraying

  • Spray the following landscape shrubs for the following insect pests: arborvitae, hemlock and juniper(spider mites), azalea and pyracantha (lace bug) and euonymus (scale). .
  • Spray for peach tree borer on your nectarine and peach tree trunks.
  • Continue with rose spray program.
  • Keep a close eye on all fall vegetable plants. Insects and diseases are more severe in the autumn.
  • Control the following woody weeds by spraying the recommended herbicide: trumpet creeper, and blackberry.

Lawn Care

  • Tall fescue and bluegrass lawns should be seeded this month. Remember to mulch the newly seeded areas with wheat or barley straw. Keep watered.
  • Fertilize and lime your tall fescue lawns according to soil test results.
  • Do NOT fertilize zoysia now.
  • Homeowners can apply an insecticide for lawn grubs in early September if needed.

Propagation

  • Spring flowering bulbs can be divided and replanted this month. Daffodils will be the bulbs that most likely need this consideration.
  • Divide peonies.

Specific Chores

  • Clean up garden sprayers and lawn equipment if not in use.
  • Prepare house plants to reenter your home. Check them carefully for insect pests.
  • If you do not have a fall vegetable garden, it is a good time to chop, burn or discard dead vegetable plants.
  • Look for spring flowering bulbs to plant in October.
  • You can get last year’s poinsettia to flower by placing it in total uninterrupted darkness for 15 hours a day, starting the last week of the month and continuing until colored bracts appear. Give them plenty of sunlight during the day.

To Do List for August

Lawn Care
•    Treat all lawns for grubs with the recommended insecticides.
•    1/3rd of the growth should be removed when mowing warm season grasses.
•    Try to change direction when mowing your lawn.  This will help strengthen the roots system and expose different sides of the plant to sunlight.

Fertilizing
•    Be sure to fertilize strawberries with nitrogen this month.
•    Do NOT fertilize shrubs this month.
•    Now is a good time to take soil samples from your lawn especially if you plan to put out cool season grasses.  Soil boxes can be picked-up at the County Extension office.

Planting
•    Vegetables to be planted in August: beets, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, radish, rutabaga, spinach, squash, and turnips.
•    Transplant broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower plants in mid-August.
•    Continue repotting overgrown houseplants.
•    Plant pansy seeds in flats this month so they can be transplanted to the landscape in September.
•    Perennial seeds to sow this month: hollyhock, delphinium, and stokesia
•    Spider lily, colchicum, and sternbergia bulbs should be planted this month.

Pruning
•    Late summer is NOT a good time to prune trees and shrubs because pruning will stimulate new growth.  That new growth will not have enough time to harden before it turns cold.  Late January and February are the best times to do major pruning.
•    Any dead or diseased wood can be pruned out anytime of the year.
•    Excessive growth on wisteria vines should be stopped to encourage blooms.  Cutting back runners and root pruning can do this.  Use a sharp spade and insert the blade to its full depth in a semi-circle about 6 feet from the main stem.

Spraying 
•    Watch shrubs for the following insects: spider mites, and lace bugs.
•    Use recommended herbicide to control poison ivy, honeysuckle, greenbriar, kudzu, trumpet creeper, and wisteria if desired.
•    Continue with rose spraying program.
•    Continue fungicide program for fruit trees and bunch grapes.
•    Peach and nectarine tree need a trunk spray for peach tree borers at the end of August.
•    Spray the following vegetables if insects are observed: broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and squash.
(Pesticides should be used sparingly!  Use only when needed and always follow the label)

Other Activities
•    Prepare a planting plan if you intend on doing some fall landscaping.
•    Now is a good time to construct a compost bin, if desired.
•    Irish potatoes can be dug up this month.

(From: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/Gardening+Calendar+August/)