To Do in May

Fertilizing

  • Fertilize summer flowering plants like crape myrtle and rose- of-Sharon this month.
  • Do not forget to sidedress or fertilize your vegetable six to eight weeks after germination.

Planting

  • Plant gladioli bulbs (corms) this month.
  • Plant summer annuals like begonia, geranium, marigold, petunia and zinnia this month.
  • The following vegetable plants can be set out this month: eggplant, pepper, tomato and sweet potato.
  • The following vegetables can be planted this month: beans, lima beans, cantaloupe, corn, cucumbers, okra, southern peas, pumpkin, squash and watermelon.
  • Plant warm season herbs such as basil.  Divide and transplant mature herb plantings.

Pruning

  • Prune your hybrid rhododendrons after they finish flowering.
  • Prune any hedges that have outgrown their desired shape.
  • Begin pinching your chrysanthemums and continue through early July.
  • Pick off azalea leaf galls as they form.
  • Do NOT cut back spring bulb foliage until it turns yellow and brown.

Spraying

  • Spray the following landscape shrubs for the following insect pests: arborvitae-bag worm, azalea-lace bug, boxwood-leaf miner, euonymus-scale, hemlock and juniper-spruce mites, pyracantha-lace bug and hybrid rhododendron borer if needed.
  • Spray iris beds for iris borers if needed.
  • Spray the following vegetables if insects are observed: cucumber (cucumber beetle), squash (squash borer and aphids, tomato and eggplant (flea beetle), broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower (worms).
  • Weekly sprays on red-tip photinia if leaf spot is observed.
  • Continue with rose spray program.
  • Keep spraying your tree fruits and bunch grapes with a fungicide program.
  • Use pesticides sparingly. Spray only when needed and follow all instructions on the label.

Lawn Care

  • Fertilize zoysia this month after it has greened up. Do NOT fertilize tall fescue now.
  • Start warm season lawns like zoysia in May.
  • Mowing heights for your lawn are important. Cut tall fescue and bluegrass at three inches, zoysia at one inch.

Propagation

  • Take softwood cuttings of plants like azalea, rhododendron, forsythia, clematis, chrysanthemum and geranium in late May if you have a misting system.

Specific Chores

  • Purchase locally grown strawberries.
  • Move houseplants outside if desired.
  • If weather has been dry, give favorite plants a good soaking once a week.

From http://catawba.ces.ncsu.edu/calendar-2/

To Do in April

Fertilizing

  • Fertilize azaleas after they bloom
  • Fertilize annuals, shrubs, and trees that were not fertilized in the fall

Planting

  • Plant summer bulbs
  • The average last spring frost date in Durham County is April 13, +/- 11 days. After last frost, plant herbs and warm-season vegetables.
  • The following warm-weather vegetable can be planted this month:  green beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, sweet potatoes, melons, swiss chard, beets, cantaloupe, and corn.
  • Replace cool-season annuals, such as pansies with summer annuals.
  • Plant perennial seeds, such as hollyhock, coreopsis, daisy, phlox and Sweet William.
  • Plant small fruit plants, such as strawberry, blueberry and blackberry.

Pruning

  • Cut back butterfly bushes to approximately 30”
  • Cut back ornamental grasses close to the ground
  • Prune azaleas after they bloom
  • Pinch chrysanthemums to promote later bloom

Spraying

  • Spray insect oil on fruit trees
  • Check azaleas, rhododendron and pyrachanta for lace bugs.  Treat with an insecticide if necessary.
  • Spray roses before buds open.
  • Begin spraying to control poison ivy, honeysuckle and kudzu with a recommended herbicide.

Lawn Care

  • Start mowing tall fescue to three inches
  • Begin irrigation
  • Fertilize warm-season grasses
  • Do not fertilize cool-season grasses, such as tall fescue, Kentucky blue grass and fine fescue now.
  • Mow your warm-season grasses at the correct height.  Bermuda and zoysia at 1 inch and St. Augustine at 2-3 inches.

Propagation

  • Divide perennials such as daylilies and hostas

Specific Chores

  • Perform mower maintenance
  • Re-mulch beds
  • Clean out water gardens

To Do in January

Lawn Care
•    Keep tree leaves from collecting on your lawn.

Fertilizing
•    Spread ashes from the fireplace around gardens and bulb beds where soil pH is below 6.0.  Avoid acid-loving plants.  (3 lbs of ash = 1 lb of limestone)
•    Now is the time to put out limestone if needed (it takes about three months for lime to change the soil’s pH)
•    Fertilize houseplants as needed.

Planting
•    Asparagus crowns can be planted at this time.

Propagation
•    Hardwood cuttings of many landscape plants like forsythia (yellow bells), flowering quince, weigela, crape myrtle, juniper, spirea and hydrangea can be taken this month.

Pruning
•    Prune grape vines
•    Any dead or diseased wood can be pruned out anytime of the year.
•    Weeds or unnecessary trees should be removed from the landscape.

Spraying
•    None

Other Activities
•    Poinsettias should be placed in the sunniest room in the house.
•    If you have received your soil recommendations, apply lime as suggested.  Don’t apply fertilizer until spring.
•    Order fruit trees and grape vines now if you wish to plant them in February and March.
•    Continue putting the leaves from your yard into a compost bin.

To Do in November

Planting

  • Trees and shrubs can be transplanted in the autumn.
  • Plant one year old asparagus crowns in the vegetable garden this month.
  • Finish planting spring-flowering bulbs.

Pruning

  • Time to trim existing asparagus foliage. Cut to the ground after the foliage is killed by frost.
  • Cut back and clean up frost-killed perennials.
  • When cutting holiday greener, use sharp pruners to make cuts above a bud or side branch.
  • Prune out older canes on blackberries and raspberries.
  • Do NOT prune shrubs in September, October, or November

Spraying

  • None

Lawn Care

  • Mow your cool season or tall fescue lawn as needed.
  • Keep tree leaves from collecting on your lawn.

Propagation

  • Water your cuttings in the coldframe as needed.
  • You may want to try your hand at air layering on some of your house plants like dieffenbachia or dumb cane.

Specific Chores

  • Soil test results should be back if samples were sent in September or October. Apply the recommended lime to the areas in need of liming. Wait until spring to fertilize.
  • Remember that peak season soil test fees begin December 1, so get your samples in early this month to avoid the fee.
  • Check with the local Extension office for the recommended fruit varieties for the area.
  • Order fruit trees and grape vines this month for a February or March delivery and planting.
  • Remember to water your evergreen trees and shrubs thoroughly before winter set in, particularly if weather conditions have been dry.
  • Look to see if screens or windbreaks are needed around your home.
  • Continue filling the compost bin with the fallen leaves.
  • Look for yuletide plants as gifts. Remember, some plants like poinsettias should be placed in the sunniest room in the house.
  • Consider giving your family gardener a holiday gift to use in the garden.

To Do in July

Fertilizing

  • Continue sidedressing your garden vegetables.
  • July is the month we recommend giving landscape plants a second (last) feeding of fertilizer.
  • Take soil samples form your lawn areas for testing. Soil boxes are available at the County Extension Center.

Planting

  • Plants of brussel sprouts and collards can be set out in mid-July.
  • You can begin your fall vegetable garden this month. Plant beans, carrots, brussels sprouts, and tomatoes in July.
  • Start broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower plants in peat pots to transplant into the vegetable garden in mid-August.
  • Begin repotting overgrown houseplants.

Pruning

  • Prune “bleeder” trees like maple, dogwood, birch and elm this month.
  • Prune the fruiting canes of raspberry and blackberry plants after harvest is over. Cut canes at ground level.
  • Prune off dieback limbs on hybrid rhododendron, azalea, mountain laurel, and blueberry.
  • Trim hedges as needed.
  • Continue pruning white pines and narrowleaf evergreens like juniper early in the month.
  • Remove faded flowers on flowering perennials to encourage a second flowering.
  • Pinch your chrysanthemums the first week only!
  • Do NOT prune spring flowering shrubs now.

Spraying

  • Spray the following landscape shrubs for the following insect pests: arborvitae (bagworms), azalea and pyracantha (lace bug).
  • Spray for Japanese beetles as needed.
  • Continue with rose spray program.
  • Spray your tree fruits and bunch grapes on a regular basis.
  • Spray the following vegetables if insects are observed: cucumber (cucumber beetle), squash (aphids), tomato and eggplant (flea beetle).
  • Spray woody weeds like poison ivy, honeysuckle and kudzu with a recommended herbicide.
  • NOTE, spray only as needed, and follow all instructions on pesticide labels.

Lawn Care

  • Remember to change direction when moving your lawn. Travel north to south on one mowing and east to west on the next cutting.
  • Continue feeding your zoysia lawn with fertilizer. Do NOT give tall fescue or bluegrass lawns any fertilizer this month.
  • Maintain 3″ mowing height on fescue.

Propagation

  • This month is still a great time to take semi-hardwood cuttings of azaleas, holly, rhododendron and many other shrubs.
  • July is an ideal time to divide and transplant your iris and daylilies.

Specific Chores

  • July is a good month to see if and where your home can use some additional shade trees.
  • Blossom-end rot may be seen on tomatoes this month. Two factors – too little water and too little lime /calcium the soil – may be the reason.
  • In dry weather, both your vegetable garden and landscape plants will benefit from a good soaking watering. Slow watering will penetrate the root zone better. Apply 1″ of water early in the day.

From http://catawba.ces.ncsu.edu/calendar-2/